Structure, discipline put sky-high goals in reach



As a middle schooler, Andrew Franz could not seem to complete simple chores in a timely manner. Taking out the trash, changing the cat litter, finishing assignments on time—none of it seemed to matter.

Then his mother introduced him to Luanne Todd, a certified Strategic Instruction Model Professional Developer.

“I do not know how she found her, but it was just what I needed,” says Franz.

He and Todd worked together on the Assignment Completion Strategy and use of the Quality Quest Planner, a journey that was not without its ups and downs. But through perseverance, says Todd, their efforts began to pay off.

“One morning, according to his mother, Andy had an ‘epiphany’ about knowing what day it was and taking out the garbage without her reminder,” says Todd. “She was thrilled!”

Using the strategy gave Franz structure and discipline that have become intrinsic parts of his life. Even now, as a student at the University of Alabama pursuing a degree in criminal justice, he uses a modified form of the strategy to keep on top of assignments and commitments.

“The Assignment Completion Strategy has by far impacted my scholastic career more than anything else I have learned,” he says. “It not only helped correct my path but gave me the foundation to keep going and succeed on the highest levels.”

When Franz graduates from college, he will be commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Air Force. His academic success has made him a top candidate for a highly competitive position of pilot or navigator within the Air Force.

“I would just like to say that although the Assignment Completion Strategy is great, Luanne was the one that did all the hard work setting it up and teaching me for hours upon hours when I could not understand it,” Franz says. “She not only deserves recognition but a medal! It is safe to say she was the single person who put me on the path I am today, and I owe her a ton.”

—This article first appeared in 30 x 30: Thirty Stories of Success, Hope, and Innovation, © 2008, The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning.


Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2012 in About Students, Learning Strategies